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5 Signs Your Intuition is Being Blocked

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5 Signs Your Intuition is Being Blocked
Courtesy: http://www.powerofpositivity.com

Otherwise known as our “sixth sense,” intuition does in fact play a powerful role in our daily lives, whether we know it or not. Any time you get a bad feeling in the pit of your stomach about something and decide not to go through with it, this is actually your intuition kicking in to warn you of upcoming dangers. On the flip side, you use this same sense when you hear about an opportunity for a job and just know you should apply for it based on a hunch.

According to Psychology Today, many studies have been performed to try to prove the existence of this elusive sixth sense, including an independent experiment carried out by an engineer and two psychologists spread out around the globe. As one person, the sender, directed emotional thoughts toward a receiver located thousands of miles away, they observed substantial variations in the receiver’s finger blood volume. This indicates that on a subconscious level, the receiver felt the message entering his or her field of consciousness, and his/her body responded to the stimuli accordingly.

We have amazing capabilities as human beings, far beyond what we have been taught in school and mainstream media, but oftentimes we have blockages in our bodies or minds that prevent us from experiencing the phenomenon of intuition.

Here are 5 factors that can inhibit your intuition:

1. You let the logical mind control your thoughts and actions.

The greatest adversary of intuition, logic can impede on your ability to feel things instinctually and bar access to your highest self. We’ve been conditioned most of our lives to think in a linear fashion, which stifles creativity and a deeper connection to ourselves and the world around us. People have taught us that knowledge exists in textbooks, not within our own minds. In school, you are taught what to think, not how to think. More importantly, the average curriculum doesn’t delve into esoteric topics such as how to use your intuition, and how to decode your feelings. Analytical thinking can help us solve problems, but it also distances us from using what we already intuitively know to navigate life’s circumstances.

Intuition often doesn’t make sense, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t right. Go with your gut instinct, not what your mind tries to persuade you to believe.

2. Negative events keep happening in your life.

If you haven’t been going within and paying attention to any signs the universe might send to you, you might make decisions that don’t really serve your best interest. Many people operate on autopilot and have no idea how much better their lives could be if they just started to become more aware of themselves and their surroundings. Take some time each day to meditate, journal, get some fresh air, do yoga, or anything else that brings you into the present moment and allows you to access your creativity. You will miss important messages by hurrying through your life each day, so slow down and live more consciously to stay connected to your intuition.

3 You live too much in your ego

Constantly comparing yourself to others, belittling yourself, worrying too much, and needing to compete with others to validate your self-worth all point to signs that you have lost touch with your intuition. The ego wants to maintain control of your life, and will keep you on lockdown unless you learn to live more from your heart instead. Meditation helps greatly in dissolving the ego, because you will realize that the self doesn’t really exist, only your awareness does. The ego represents the mind, while the true self signifies the heart. Since intuition is based off of feelings rather than logical thought, you need to silence the chatter of your mind so that you can flow through life effortlessly rather than force your way through it with the domineering ego.

4. You put too much weight in what others think.

You can’t live intuitively if you constantly seek approval from others – if you base your life solely around other people’s opinions, you will never live authentically. Your intuition knows best, so don’t waste too much energy on getting others who don’t share your views to see things eye to eye with you. They may never agree with how you live, so don’t bother persuading them to. Feel confident enough in your own decisions that you don’t even need others to validate your choices. It takes some practice, but you have your own internal guidance system directing you every day; you just have to allow your own inner voice to speak louder than those of everyone around you.

5. You feel disconnected from yourself and your surroundings.

As your intuition becomes more powerful, you will harness deeper relationships with yourself and others, and you will have more empathy for all life on Earth. You will realize that you have the potential to impact this world in a unique way, and that you no longer need to rely on anything outside yourself to thrive on this planet. If you don’t currently feel this way, don’t get discouraged. Simply relax your mind and let the wisdom already within you come to the surface. The fast-paced world we live in can distract us from our true nature very easily, so make sure you unplug from the matrix every once in a while and connect to the vast knowledge of the higher realms.

We all have an innate ability to use our intuition to master our lives, but it takes some effort to reconnect with our sixth sense in the unnatural world we live in. If you want to start living a more intentional, happy life, make sure you meditate often, live from your heart, and trust your instincts above all else.

Money Tree

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Money Tree

Pachira aquatica

Money Tree Plant Features

  1. While it doesn’t immediately produce dollars, money tree is said bring good luck and is a favorite plant for applications of Feng Shui.
  2. The tree offers shiny, hand-shaped leaves that lend it a decidedly tropical appearance.
  3. You may also see several money trees grown together in a single pot with their trunks braided together. This is common way to make it look more decorative and doesn’t harm the plant at all.
  4. Money tree is frequently used as a specimen for bonsai, as well, and can develop a fat, dense trunk.
     

Money Tree Growing Instructions

  • No matter which way your money tree is shaped when you get it, the plant does best in a bright spot and regular watering.
  • This is a good houseplant if you tend to overwater plants, as it appreciates (but doesn’t need) constantly moist soil.
  • Being a tropical, money tree also appreciates abundant humidity.
  • If the leaves start to have brown, crispy edges, placing it with other plants or near a small humidifier can help.
  • You can prune money tree at any time. Pruning money tree will help it grow more full and bushy.
  • Fertilize money tree two or three times in spring and summer with a regular houseplant fertilizer.
  • You can fertilize it more frequently if you want it to grow faster. Make sure to follow the directions on the fertilizer package.

***Note:***  Money tree is not intended for human or animal consumption. 

Light

  • Indoors: High light

Colors

  • Green

Water

  • Constantly moist soil, Medium water needs

Special Features

  • Purifies the air
  • Super-easy to grow

Complement your Money Tree with these varieties:

Calathea
Calathea is a lovely way to provide an interesting groundcover effect in a pot with a tall money tree.

Baby’s Tears
Soften the look of your money plant’s container by giving it a skirt of soft baby’s tears.

Peace Lily
Peace lily looks fantastic with money tree and both appreciate moist potting mix.

Plants Connected to this Article:

  • Lucky Bamboo -Dracaena sanderiana

  • Glowee -Sansevieria trifasciata

  • Money Tree – Pachira aquatica

  • Baby’s Tears – Soleirolia soleirolii

  • Calathea – Calathea spp.

  • Peace Lily – Spathiphyllum spp.

  • Banana – Musa spp

  • Fern – Various

  • Peperomia – Peperomia spp.

  • Madagascar Dragon Tree – Dracaena marginata

  • Red Aglaonema – Aglaonema spp.

  • Elephant’s Ear – Alocasia spp.

  • Zebra Plant – Aphelandra squarrosa

  •  

Glowee

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Glowee – Sansevieria trifasciata

Glowee Plant Features

  1. Glowee is an easy-to-grow plant that glows in the dark!
  2. It’s especially fun to grow in a child’s bedroom where it can be a living nightlight, but will thrive in just about any room of your house.
  3. During the day, Glowee features stiff, upright foliage that has a sleek, modern feel.
  4. At night, those vertical leaves give off a soft, greenish glow.
  5. Glowee is 100 percent plant; it’s not a weird, genetically modified organism.

***Note:*** Light, whether natural or artificial, “charges” Glowee. The brighter the light, the more Glowee glows! Also, certain types of light (for instance, natural sunlight or black light) will make the glow more intense.

Glowee Growing Instructions
  • Like most plants, Glowee doesn’t require natural light to grow. It thrives just fine under artificial light — including in offices and classrooms.
  • Glowee does best in medium to bright light, but tolerates low-light conditions well, too.
  • Water Glowee regularly when the top inch or two of the soil dries out.

***Notes:***

  • Glowee would rather be kept too dry than too wet.
  • Glowee is not intended for human or animal consumption.

Light

  • Indoors: High light
  • Indoors: Low light
  • Indoors: Medium light
Colors
  • Green

Water

  • Low water needs
Special Features
  • Purifies the air
  • Super-easy to grow

Plants Connected to this Article:

Lucky Bamboo

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Lucky Bamboo – Dracaena sanderiana

Lucky Bamboo Plant Features

  1. Lucky bamboo is a wonderful gift plant that adds a bold note to indoor decor with its often intricately arranged stems.
  2. It’s a slow-growing foliage houseplant that’s easy to care for in a low- or medium-light spot.
  3. You can find lucky bamboo available in an almost endless variety of arrangements, including heart shapes, twists, curls, and more.
  4. There’s even lore about how many stems are in the arrangements!
  5. This indoor plant grows well on desks and tabletops, making it a fun addition to your office, school, or home.
  6. Because lucky bamboo typically grows in water, you can personalize yours by putting it in watertight container you wish; secure the stems in place with marbles, stones, or other materials.

Lucky Bamboo Growing Instructions

  • Grow lucky bamboo in low or medium light for best results. It can take a high-light spot, but lucky bamboo doesn’t like direct sun so it’s best to protect it with a sheer curtain to diffuse the light.
  • You’ll often see lucky bamboo sold without soil. The stems may be submerged in water and pebbles, gravel, marbles, or even colorful gels.
  • Lucky bamboo is happiest when you keep the stems submerged. Some people like to use rain water to reduce the chemical content in the water, but for the most part, this plant grows just fine in regular tap water.
  • If you wish to fertilize your lucky bamboo, use a fertilizer for aquatic plants and follow the directions on the fertilizer package.
  • If your lucky bamboo outgrows its container, you can easily transfer it to a larger container. Pack in pebbles, stones, or other materials to help keep the stems upright.

***Note:*** Lucky bamboo is not intended for human or animal consumption.

  • Light

    Indoors: Low light
    Indoors: Medium light

  • Colors

    Green, Variegated

  • Water

    Constantly moist soil

  • Special Features

    Purifies the air
    Super-easy to grow

Complement your Lucky Bamboo with these varieties:

Glowee
Lucky bamboo is a stunning plant during the day. Accent it at night with no-fuss glow-in-the-dark Glowee!

Money Tree
Grow lucky bamboo for good luck and money tree for good fortune! Both plants are a cinch to cultivate and look good together.

Plants Connected to this Article:

Top 12 Healthy Foods for Better Immune System

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Prepare early for the flu season by boosting your health. Since your immune system is your first-line of defense against the flu, it makes perfect sense to strengthen your body. Here are my top 12 foods for healthier and stronger immune response.

Top 12 Healthy Foods for Better Immune System.

Historical Figures You Didn’t Know Were Black

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Is Michelle Obama Still The First Black First Lady? 

Do you know which one of your bills features a black man?

You might be surprised at the historical figures you didn’t know were black.

Has compiled the following list and information for us, but since each one is on a different clickable link and these type of pages offer a plethora of advertisements causing the pages to load slowly or not at all, I have put them all here together in this blog. 

Immediately below this text is a link to her website where you can get other social media links and scroll through some of her other interesting posts.

 http://madamenoire.com/481003/historical-figures-you-didnt-know-were-black/

1.  Betty Boop

Image Source: Twitter.com

They might have drawn Betty Boop white, but her history is black. The character was actually stolen from Cotton Club singer Esther Jones — known by her stage name “Baby Esther” and the baby talk she used when she sang songs like “I Wanna Be Loved By You (Boop- Boop-BeDoo). Her act later “inspired” cartoonist Max Fleischer to create the character Betty Boop and Esther tried to win the rights back to her character until the day she died.

2.   J. Edgar Hoover

Image Source: Twitter.com

Hitler’s Jewish ancestry isn’t the strangest twist in racial history. FBI director J. Edgar Hoover — the man who plagued the black liberation movement from Marcus Garvey to the Black Panther Party — was known by his peers as a passing black man.

His childhood neighbor writer Gore Vidal famously quoted, “It was always said in my family and around the city that Hoover was mulatto. And that he came from a family that passed.”

And apparently that was a closely-guarded secret. Millie McGhee, author of Secrets Uncovered: J. Edgar Hoover Passing For White, said,

“In the late 1950’s, I was a young girl growing up in rural McComb, Mississippi. A story had been passed down through several generations that the land we lived on was owned by the Hoover family. My grandfather told me that this powerful man, Edgar, was his second cousin, and was passing for white. If we talked about this, he was so powerful he could have us all killed. I grew up terrified about all this.”

3.  The Medici Family

Image Source: Twitter.com

It’s hard to get through any school lesson about the Italian Renaissance without talking about the Medici family. What history doesn’t like to talk about is that the financial ruler of the western world — Alessandro de Medici, Duke of Penne and Duke of Florence and commonly called “Il Moro” (Italian for Moor — a term commonly used to describe anyone with dark skin) — was born to an African-Italian mother (a servant) and a white father (who would later become Pope Clement VII)

4.  Jacqueline Onassis

Image Source: WENN.com

Image Source: WENN.com

Was Michelle Obama our first African-American First Lady? Or was it Jackie O? Jacqueline Onassis is a member of the van Salee’s family, famous for their “mulatto” heritage.

Jackie O’s ancestor John van Salee De Grasse was the first black American formally educated as a doctor; her socialite father was nicknamed “Black Jack” Bouvier because of his dark complexion.

More fun van Salee facts?: Both actor Humphrey Bogart and journalist Anderson Cooper are descendants of that famous family.

5.  Anatole Broyard

Image Source: Twitter.com

American writer Anatole Broyard passed as white his entire life. It wasn’t until his daughter, Bliss, published One Drop: My Father’s Hidden Life — A Story of Race and Family Secrets was the truth revealed: The famous New York Times book reviewer was born to light-skinned black parents in New Orleans and started passing once he grew up and moved out of his predominantly black Brooklyn neighborhood.

6.  Queen Charlotte

Image Source: Twitter.com

Queen Charlotte

This 18th century painter got into hot water when he painted Queen Charlotte’s features a little too realistically. The painting stirred up long-standing rumors about King George III’s wife’s African heritage.

And those rumors turned out to be true. Queen Charlotte was the member of a Portuguese royal family begun by Alfonso III and his lover Madragana “a moor“.

Because this makes Queen Elizabeth II, Prince Charles and Prince William technically mixed race, many historians have tried to cast doubt on the nature of Queen Charlotte’s heritage.

But her personal physician has noted her “true mulatto face” and the public report released before Queen Elizabeth II’s coronation in 1953 acknowledges the monarchy’s African heritage.

7.  Alexander Pushkin

Image Source: Twitter.com

Alexander Pushkin

The man considered the father of Russian literature was the great-grandson of an Ethiopian prince named Ibrahim Gannibal. Among Pushkin’s more famous unpublished works (left after his death in a duel) is an unfinished novel about his Ethiopian great-grandfather.

8.  Beethoven

Image Source: Twitter.com

Beethoven

The famous classical composer’s mother was a moor. It’s a fact that became popular again after this cast of his African facial features contradicted the “idealized” paintings of the man history likes to re-imagine.

9.  King Tut

Image Source: Twitter.com

King Tut

The Boy Pharaoh of Ancient Egypt is often depicted as fair skinned. But these images recovered from his tomb (in addition to several other artifacts) have identified him as a black African.

10.  Santa Claus

Image Source: Twitter.com

Santa Claus

Or at least Saint Nicholas (270 – 343 AD), the saint that the legend is based on. Old Saint Nick was born in what’s now considered Turkey (at the time a metropolis for people of African descent).

11.  Hannibal

Image Source: Twitter.com

Hannibal

Hannibal of Carthage — one of the greatest military strategists in history is often depicted with much… narrower features. But these coins depicting Hannibal and his famous army of elephants leave little doubt in the minds of many historians of his African ancestry.

12.  Saint Augustine

Image Source: Twitter.com

Saint Augustine

No course covering Philosophy 101 is complete without referencing Christian theologian Saint Augustine. What’s less commonly covered is his African origins and birth place of (modern-day) Souk Ahras, Algeria;

13.  Alexandre Dumas

Image Source: Twitter.com

The Author Of The Three Musketeers And The Count of Monte Cristo

Alexandre Dumas was the son of the General Dumas born in 1762 to a white father and an enslaved mother. General Dumas was such a good general that he made his rival — Napoleon Bonaparte — nervous. Thanks to Napoleon’s machinations, the General ended up imprisoned in a dungeon for years — the story that inspired Alexandre to write The Count of Monte Cristo about his father.

14.  Alexander Hamilton

Image Source: Twitter.com

The Man On The $10 Bill

For black history buffs, it’s really all about the Hamiltons.  Alexander Hamilton isn’t just the man on the $10 bill, he was the United States’ first Secretary of the Treasury.

His mother, Rachel Fawcett Lavain, was said to be of “mixed blood” and his father was the son of a Scottish Duke. Alexander’s older brother was dark-skinned and treated as black. But Alexander was light enough to pass and went on to establish the first national bank in the American colonies, founded the U.S. mint and wrote most of the Federalist Papers.

15.  Clark Gable

Image Source: Twitter.com

Clark Gable

The original “tall, dark and handsome” actor didn’t hide his Black and Native American heritage. And when he saw “colored” and “white” bathrooms on the set of Gone With The Wind, he refused to continue working until all of the cast members were treated equally.